Professional Development Courses & Workshops

History Roundtables

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The mission of the Department of History is to provide students with knowledge about the origins and development of peoples in the past, as well as to develop their ability to conduct research, analyze evidence, and express defensible conclusions orally and in writing. History majors will be prepared for successful professional careers as secondary teachers, college or university professors, journalists, lawyers, civil servants, and historians in government and private agencies. Studying the past will prepare literate, conscientious, and informed persons who appreciate the legacies of history and understand how it affects the present.

As part of Regional & Continuing Education’s efforts to bring more on-campus events to our online students – and to the community at large – the History Department presentations below are now available online.

History Forums

Slavery on Free Soil: California’s Unfree Past

Dr. Stacey Smith

Associate Professor,

Oregon State University

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When one thinks of 19th Century slavery in the U.S., one usually thinks of the Southern States that comprised the Confederate side in the Civil War. However, in her presentation – and in her book, Freedom’s Frontier: California’s Struggle over Unfree Labor, Emancipation, and Reconstruction – Dr. Stacey Smith examines the battle over slavery in California. The state had antislavery language in its constitution, but included many inhumane labor systems: African-American Slavery, American Indian indentured servitude, Latino and Chinese contract labor, and the sex trafficking of American Indian and Chinese women. In fact, Dr. Smith notes, some forms of slavery in California continued beyond 1865, when the slaves in the South were freed with the end of the Civil War.

Presentation Time: 1 hour, 9 minutes

Tudor Memories: 500 Years of Commemoration at Hampton Court Palace

Dr. Jason Nice

Professor, History Department, CSU, Chico

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Dr. Jason Nice explores the curious representations of the Tudors as they have evolved over the centuries. The depiction of Henry VIII and his many wives especially has evolved in interesting ways in the five centuries since they lived in Hampton Court Palace. Dr. Nice provides his audience with a better understanding of how and why different generations of Britons, and Americans, have embraced or rejected commemorations of the Tudors. He also discusses how Hampton Court Palace gradually transformed from a royal residence into a site of memory after the reign of Henry VIII. The Palace was visited by 563,407 people in 2013.

Presentation Time: 1 hour, 3 minutes

Hidden in Plain Sight - Slavery in Your Community

Dr. Kate Transchel

Professor, History Department, CSU, Chico

Presented at TEDxChico 2013

 

Hidden in Plain Sight - Slavery in Your Community

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(Transcript unavailable)

Since 1999, Dr. Transchel has been researching modern day human trafficking around the world. Her findings, after interviews with dozens of victims, will surprise and shock even those who consider themselves well-informed. Besides working as a professor of history at CSU Chico, Dr. Transchel provides trainings for various branches of the military, as well as the State Department, on domestic and international human trafficking. She also serves as an expert witness on human trafficking from Moldova in Federal Asylum hearings.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.

Presentation Time: 19 minutes

Is History Bunk?

Five CSU, Chico, Faculty Members from the Philosophy and History Departments

 

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(Transcript unavailable)

Five CSU, Chico professors engage in a lively discussion of the question of historical truth; more specifically, how do post-modernist definitions of truth intersect with historical practice and the nature of history as an academic discipline? Post-modernism attacks the notion that history is different from literature because historians claim they are using facts. The post-modernist argues that the historian’s choice of certain facts and how he/she tries to give these facts/events meaning and context show that history is inherently subjective. The panel includes Dr. Jason Nice & Dr. Laird Easton, CSU, Chico History Department Faculty; and Dr. Edward Pluth, Dr. Wai-hung Wong, & Dr. Zanja Yudell, CSU, Chico Philosophy Department Faculty.

Presentation Time: 1 hour, 33 minutes

Are We Rome or Are We Greece?

Dr. Caroline Winterer,

Professor of History and Classics, Stanford University

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Dr. Winterer explores the question of which culture has influenced the United States the most – Ancient Greece or Ancient Rome?  She begins her presentation by using as an example the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the U.S.  She connects this to the way Americans “have embraced the ancient cultures of Greece and Rome — especially Ancient Rome – as a way of framing their analysis of what happened to us on that day a little over 10 years ago.” She goes on to illustrate how, over the course of American history, those cultures “have filled the American imagination and have become a font of ideas, so that when something like 9/11 happens, we have a frame of reference for understanding it.” Dr. Winterer’s appearance serves as the CSU, Chico History Department’s annual Joanna Cowden Memorial Lecture.

Presentation Time: 45 minutes

Unspeakable Awfulness: America through the Eyes of European Travelers, 1865-1900

Dr. Kenneth Rose,

Professor, History Department, CSU, Chico

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Transcript with PowerPoint

European travelers descended upon the United States in droves after the Civil War ended in 1865. They encountered a society and a landscape that sometimes resembled their own, but could also be strikingly different.  Dr. Rose’s talk emphasizes aspects of the United States that these travelers found to be most foreign to their experience, including the wilderness of the American West, gun use in the United States, and American notions of class. Many famous European authors visited and wrote about what they saw – sometimes in horror – including Oscar Wilde, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, and Robert Lewis Stevenson. At the time of this presentation, Dr. Rose was completing a book with the same title (Published by Routledge, 2013).

Presentation Time: 58 minutes

The Adventure of Adventure: History of an Obsession in Western Culture

Dr. Laird Easton,

History Professor,

California State University, Chico

Adventure Adventure

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Transcript with PowerPoint

 

Adventure has been a keyword in Western culture since the Middle Ages, according to Laird Easton, Professor and Chair of the Department of History at CSU, Chico.  In this History Public Lecture, Easton explores the cultural and biological roots of adventure, demonstrates the importance of adventure in the rise of Europe, and discusses its connections to both capitalism and to a modern sense of boredom. He concludes with an account of the tension between adventure and boredom in the twentieth century that he calls “The Three Empires.”

Presentation Time: 46 minutes

The Supreme Court, the Slaughter-House Cases, and the Retreat from Reconstruction

Dr. Michael Ross,

History Professor,

University of Maryland

 

Slaughter House Cases Thumb

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Transcript with PowerPoint

In this lecture, Dr. Michael Ross tackles a long-standing debate of whether the U.S. Supreme Court intentionally undermined African-Americans’ rights during Reconstruction. The “Slaughter-House Cases” marked the first time the Supreme Court heard cases testing the language of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution; the amendment prohibits states to “make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States…” Dr. Ross’ lecture is based on “Justice of Shattered Dreams,” his prize-winning biography of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Freeman Miller,  who wrote the majority opinion in the Slaughter-House Cases decision.  Dr. Ross’ appearance serves as the CSU, Chico History Department’s annual Joanna Dunlap Cowden Memorial Lecture.

Presentation Time:  1 hour, 13 minutes

Higher Education in California: Past, Present, and Future

Dr. Paul Zingg, President, CSU, Chico

Dr. John Aubrey Douglass, Senior Research Fellow, Center for Studies in Higher Education, UC Berkeley

Dr. Laird Easton (moderator), Professor, History Department, CSU, Chico

 

Histroy Roundtable

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Transcript

The Master Plan for Higher Education was hailed as a great innovation when it was instituted in California in 1960.  The concept of coordinating the roles of community colleges, state colleges, and the University of California campuses was not only unusual at the time, but served as a model for other states.  The Plan offered outstanding higher education opportunities for California students at a very low cost.  However, in the 21st Century the Plan has suffered from massive budget cuts.  Dr. Zingg and Dr. Douglass discuss the Plan’s history and how it relates to the challenges of today.

Presentation Time:  1 hour, 21 minutes